Cameron Diaz by Terry Richardson for Esquire

The November issue of British Esquire features none other than Cameron Diaz on the cover photographed by Terry Richardson. Here we take away at some throw-away shots with the accomplished 40-year-old actress.

Everyone’s got a soft spot for Cameron Diaz. The Esquire November cover shoot should be enough to make you like her even more. Cameron Diaz, the ultimate California girl, looks incredible at 40. “For the first time in my life I’m content,” she says on entering her fifth decade. “I’m so excited. Getting older is the best part of life. Like, I know more than I’ve ever known. I have gratitude. I know myself better. I feel more capable than ever. And as far as the physicality of it – I feel better at 40 than I did at 25.” Photographer Terry Richardson captures the actress in a series of memorable poses – see the full shoot (believe us, you want to) and interview in the November issue, on sale Thursday 4 October. Also available as a Digital Edition. Read More at Esquire

Cameron Michelle Diaz (born August 30, 1972) is an American actress and former model. She rose to prominence during the 1990s with roles in the movies The MaskMy Best Friend’s Wedding and There’s Something About Mary. Other high-profile credits include the two Charlie’s Angels films, voicing the character Princess Fiona in the Shrek series, The HolidayThe Green Hornet and Bad Teacher. Diaz received Golden Globe award nominations for her performances in the movies There’s Something About MaryBeing John MalkovichVanilla Sky, andGangs of New York. Source – Wikipedia

Terrence “Terry” Richardson (born August 14, 1965) is an American fashion photographer. There are several repeating themes in Richardson’s work, notably that of putting high-profile celebrities in mundane situations and photographing them using traditionally pedestrian methods, such as the use of an instant camera.  His work also explores ideas of sexuality, with many of the pieces featured in his books Kibosh and Terryworld depicting full-frontal nudity and both simulated and unsimulated sexual acts. Initially, many of Richardson’s subjects would be shot before a white background but he eventually expanded to other backdrops. He is also well known for posing with his subjects, often trading his trademark glasses with them so they may “pretend to be him” and vice versa. Source – Wikipedia