All posts by Uristocrat

St. Louis city, county sue Rams and NFL for breach of anything they can think of







Back when St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke picked up his team and moved it to Los Angeles, I noted here that hey, I wondered if PSL holders could sue for breach of contract, since they now held the right to buy tickets that didn’t exist? As it turned out, they could, and did, and won, sorta. I did not suggest that the city of St. Louis could sue as well, and for 15 months I was right — until yesterday:

The city, the county and the Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority are suing the National Football League over the relocation of the Rams 15 months ago.

The 52-page suit filed Wednesday in St. Louis Circuit Court lists the National Football League and all 32 NFL clubs as defendants and seeks damages and restitution of profits.

If you’re wondering, “Hey, isn’t the NFL one of those cartel thingies where franchises have the right to move wherever, so long as the other owners say it’s okay?”, why yes. it is. But St. Louis’s lawyers have thought of that, arguing that the Rams “failed to satisfy the obligations imposed by the League’s relocation rules,” and so therefore the public is entitled to damages for:

  • Breach of contract (against all defendants).
  • Unjust enrichment (against all defendants).
  • Fraudulent misrepresentation (against the Rams and team owner Stan Kroenke).
  • Fraudulent misrepresentation (against all defendants).
  • Tortious interference with business expectancy (against all defendants except the Rams). This last count basically alleges that the NFL and the other 31 teams “intentionally interfered” with the business relationship between the St. Louis plaintiffs and the Rams by approving the relocation.

The suit says that the city of St. Louis is losing an estimated $1.85 million to $3.5 million a year in amusement and ticket tax revenue (true as far as it goes, though if bereft Rams fans are spending some of their entertainment dollars on other amusements, the city is getting some of that tax money back) plus about $7.5 million in property tax (whuh?), $1.4 million in sales tax revenue (again, not so much if some fans spend that money on other St. Louis activities), and “millions in earning taxes,” whatever those are. The city and county aren’t saying how much they’re looking for in damages, but if the above is any guide, it would have to be in excess of $100 million.

In essence, the city and county are saying, “Hey, no fair, you said you weren’t gonna move the team unless you had to, and then you did anyway, you cheaters” — which doesn’t seem particularly like a legal argument, but then, I am extremely not a lawyer. Whatever happens in the end, though, the discovery phase of this suit promises to be oh, so tasty, as St. Louis tries to dredge up every last detail of how the relocation decision was made and whether it followed the league’s rules that the NFL totally doesn’t just make up whenever it feels like it. We may get to be a fly on that wall after all.




via Field of Schemes

St. Louis city, county sue Rams and NFL for breach of anything they can think of







Back when St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke picked up his team and moved it to Los Angeles, I noted here that hey, I wondered if PSL holders could sue for breach of contract, since they now held the right to buy tickets that didn’t exist? As it turned out, they could, and did, and won, sorta. I did not suggest that the city of St. Louis could sue as well, and for 15 months I was right — until yesterday:

The city, the county and the Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority are suing the National Football League over the relocation of the Rams 15 months ago.

The 52-page suit filed Wednesday in St. Louis Circuit Court lists the National Football League and all 32 NFL clubs as defendants and seeks damages and restitution of profits.

If you’re wondering, “Hey, isn’t the NFL one of those cartel thingies where franchises have the right to move wherever, so long as the other owners say it’s okay?”, why yes. it is. But St. Louis’s lawyers have thought of that, arguing that the Rams “failed to satisfy the obligations imposed by the League’s relocation rules,” and so therefore the public is entitled to damages for:

  • Breach of contract (against all defendants).
  • Unjust enrichment (against all defendants).
  • Fraudulent misrepresentation (against the Rams and team owner Stan Kroenke).
  • Fraudulent misrepresentation (against all defendants).
  • Tortious interference with business expectancy (against all defendants except the Rams). This last count basically alleges that the NFL and the other 31 teams “intentionally interfered” with the business relationship between the St. Louis plaintiffs and the Rams by approving the relocation.

The suit says that the city of St. Louis is losing an estimated $1.85 million to $3.5 million a year in amusement and ticket tax revenue (true as far as it goes, though if bereft Rams fans are spending some of their entertainment dollars on other amusements, the city is getting some of that tax money back) plus about $7.5 million in property tax (whuh?), $1.4 million in sales tax revenue (again, not so much if some fans spend that money on other St. Louis activities), and “millions in earning taxes,” whatever those are. The city and county aren’t saying how much they’re looking for in damages, but if the above is any guide, it would have to be in excess of $100 million.

In essence, the city and county are saying, “Hey, no fair, you said you weren’t gonna move the team unless you had to, and then you did anyway, you cheaters” — which doesn’t seem particularly like a legal argument, but then, I am extremely not a lawyer. Whatever happens in the end, though, the discovery phase of this suit promises to be oh, so tasty, as St. Louis tries to dredge up every last detail of how the relocation decision was made and whether it followed the league’s rules that the NFL totally doesn’t just make up whenever it feels like it. We may get to be a fly on that wall after all.




via Field of Schemes

What is Rap-A-Lot Records?

Earlier today, Supreme announced that it has linked up with iconic Houston rap label Rap-A-Lot for its latest release. Rumors of this collaboration dates back to the beginning of this year, and the New York skate brand has finally taken to Instagram to release the teaser and images for the line. Rap-A-Lot was conceived in 1987 out of founder James Prince’s used car lot, originally as a way to keep his little brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, off the streets. Prince played the music game the same way he would’ve played the turf game and in a few years grew the label into a pillar of Houston and Southern hip-hop. The label introduced rap from the South to the world and delivered some of hip-hop’s biggest and most classic records of the ’90s. We’ve gathered ten important facts you should know about Rap-A-Lot Records, preferably before you cop the Supreme release when it drops on Thursday.

Rap-A-Lot Records Is a Houston Hip-Hop Label

Before James Prince founded Rap-A-Lot Records in 1987, Houston radio stations at the time would play whatever industry executives in New York City had told them to. Because of that, Houston was simply but an extension of everything that was happening in NYC. Prince, a fearless street hustler who sold exotic cars to gangsters and drug lords, didn’t like the way things were and found ways to make local stations to play his artists. James founded Rap-A-Lot to keep his brother and one of the founding members of The Geto Boys, Sir Rap-A-Lot, away from the streets. Since Prince knew many important figures via his car job, he was able to successfully finesse his way into the music industry.

The Label’s Breakthrough Act, Geto Boys, Put the South on the Map

The Geto Boys, who were assembled by Prince in Houston’s Fifth Ward, consisted of his brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, Raheem and Sire Jukebox. Sir Rap-A-Lot and Raheem later left and were replaced with DJ Ready Red, Prince Johnny C and Bushwick Billy (Little Billy at the time). Originally called “the Ghetto Boys,” their first release, Making Trouble, flopped commerically and did not get much attention, so Prince created a revamped lineup: DJ Ready Red, Bushwick Bill, Scarface (then called Akshen) and Willie D. The new crew’s 1989 album Grip It! On That Other Level became a smash hit. The album sold millions of copies and got Def Jam co-founder and successful producer Rick Rubin to notice. They dropped their eponymous album in 1990 with Rubin and We Can’t Be Stopped in 1991; both were also nationwide successes.

Rap-A-Lot Launched the Careers of Houston’s Biggest Artists

At one point, Rap-A-Lot was not only the biggest label in Houston, but the entirety of the South. According to Prince in a 2012 NPR interview, “it was like flies to honey” the way rappers came to Rap-A-Lot in the mid-’90s. Outside of Geto Boys and its member, the label kickstarted or helped with the careers of Devin the Dude, Slim Thug, Lil Keke, Z-Ro, Trae, Pimp C, Bun B, Lil Flip and others. It was also a go-to label for acts outside of Houston, including Do or Die, Yukmouth, Luniz, Outlawz and more. Rap-A-Lot’s most notable albums include Geto Boys’ self-titled album, Scarface’s The Diary, Bun B’s Trill, Pimp C’s Pimpalation, Devin the Dude’s Waiting to Inhale and Big Mike’s Somethin’ Serious.

It Has a West Coast Sub-Label Called Smoke-A-Lot Records

Smoke-A-Lot Records is a label founded by East Oakland, California rapper Yukmouth and his manager Kat Gaynor. The name derives from Yukmouth’s Luniz nickname, "Smoke-A-Lot." It is distributed by Rap-A-Lot and Asylum, and houses artists including The Luniz, Dru Down, Thug Lordz, The Regime and Yuckmouth. From its conception in 1994 to now, Smoke-A-Lot has spawned 16 studio albums and eight mixtapes. It’s latest release is Yukmouth’s 2014 album GAS (Grow And Sale).

Devin the Dude Is the Label’s Longest-Running Artist

Devin Copeland, a humorously introspective, weed-loving Houston rapper better known by his moniker Devin the Dude, started his musical career out as a member of the Odd Squad (later known as the Coughee Brothaz) alongside Jugg Mugg and Rob Quest. Later, he joined Scarface’s Facemob and ultimately went solo in 1998. Since then, Devin dropped four solo albums with Rap-A-Lot, including his highest charting album Waitin’ to Inhale in 2007. His best known records, "Lacville ’79" and "Doobie Ashtray," were also release via the label. He ended his 15-year relationship with Rap-A-Lot in 2008, signing with indie label Razor & Tie. He is now being distributed by E1 Entertainment (formerly known as Koch).

Rap-A-Lot Had Distribution With Many Different Record Labels

Rap-A-Lot was first distributed by A&M Records for a short amount of time in order to release Raheem’s 1988 debut The Vigilante. Later, the label was distributed by EMI label’s Priority Records from 1991 to 1994, Noo Trybe Records from 1994 to 1998 and Noo Trybe’s parent company Virgin Records from 1998 to 2002. From 2002 to 2013, it was distributed by WEA’s Asylum Records then Fontana Distribution. From 2013 onwards, Rap-A-Lot is distributed by RED Distribution. Prince reveals that major labels had made it difficult for people to be aware of Rap-A-Lot. "Basically everything we released was slept on to a certain extent because we didn’t have the muscle that a lot of the majors had to get the maximum amount of sales," he told NPR.

James Prince Made Sure Things Went His Way

If you got on Prince’s bad side, he would definitely make it known to you. According to Green Label, Prince stood up for rappers many times who were on the losing end of a contractual war. He allegedly stopped a Young Money tour bus because he believed that his son, Jas, wasn’t fairly compensated for a Drake album. One time, Floyd Mayweather’s camp wanted to make a deal with Prince that he didn’t agree to and sent goons over to their gym to make it known. Another time, Master P became so offended that Pimp C said that P owed him money, but Prince stood up for C and told off Master P. Even some of his clients felt Prince’s wrath: Bushwick Bill was once allegedly beat up outside of a club after he had complained about pay.

There Are Only Three Artists on the Label’s Current Roster

Rap-A-Lot has seen better days. Although they were essentially running the South in the mid-to-late ’90s, the label has been rendered nearly defunct today. There are only three artists with some sort of contractual agreement with Rap-A-Lot today: Bun B, Z-Ro and Turk. In a 2012 interview with NPR, James Prince reveals that he’s not a fan of today’s music marketplace. "This whole game right now is a game that I’m not that excited about anymore because of the new structure and all these different ways of being able to get music without paying," he shared. "It kind of kills my spirit from an entrepreneurial perspective." He continued: "It’s not like it used to be. Trust me when I tell you that it’s nowhere even close to where it used to be. The majors are more in control now than they have been in a long time."

Jas Prince Discovered Drake & Connected Him with Lil Wayne

In 2015, James Prince got at Cash Money for the alleged mismanagement of Drake’s royalties. Prince’s son, Jas Prince, is credited with discovering Drake and bringing him to Lil Wayne’s attention at his Young Money Entertainment imprint. Jas eventually settled his $11 million lawsuit with Cash Money and its Young Money imprint over the case. Lil Wayne has even expressed his eagerness in 2016 to make Rap-A-Lot his home once his legal battle with Cash Money and Birdman is over. “Houston, Texas, before I leave y’all, I want to say I know I’ll always have a home at Rap-A-Lot Records," Wayne shared at an H-Town show. "And y’all know they’re f*cking me over right now. So, before I go, I leave you with these kinds words: f*ck Cash Money.”

The Last Album it Put Out is Juvenile’s The Fundamentals in 2014

The Fundamentals is Juvenile’s eleventh studio album and was released on February 18, 2014 by Rap-A-Lot Records. Juvy started his career out signed to Warlock Records, who released music by The Jungle Brothers and early Trick Daddy material. He then inked a deal with Cash Money Records and even became one of the faces of the label in the late ’90s. After leaving Cash Money, the New Orleans rapper singed with Atlantic Records and E1 for various projects. He released three albums with his U.T.P. crew (with Wacko and Skip) throughout the 2000s via Rap-A-Lot and dropped two solo LPs through the label, 2012’s Rejuvination and 2014’s The Fundamentals. On October 28, 2014, Juvenile announced and confirmed that he had left Rap-A-Lot and re-signed to Cash Money Records.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com



via Hypebeast

What is Rap-A-Lot Records?

Earlier today, Supreme announced that it has linked up with iconic Houston rap label Rap-A-Lot for its latest release. Rumors of this collaboration dates back to the beginning of this year, and the New York skate brand has finally taken to Instagram to release the teaser and images for the line. Rap-A-Lot was conceived in 1987 out of founder James Prince’s used car lot, originally as a way to keep his little brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, off the streets. Prince played the music game the same way he would’ve played the turf game and in a few years grew the label into a pillar of Houston and Southern hip-hop. The label introduced rap from the South to the world and delivered some of hip-hop’s biggest and most classic records of the ’90s. We’ve gathered ten important facts you should know about Rap-A-Lot Records, preferably before you cop the Supreme release when it drops on Thursday.

Rap-A-Lot Records Is a Houston Hip-Hop Label

Before James Prince founded Rap-A-Lot Records in 1987, Houston radio stations at the time would play whatever industry executives in New York City had told them to. Because of that, Houston was simply but an extension of everything that was happening in NYC. Prince, a fearless street hustler who sold exotic cars to gangsters and drug lords, didn’t like the way things were and found ways to make local stations to play his artists. James founded Rap-A-Lot to keep his brother and one of the founding members of The Geto Boys, Sir Rap-A-Lot, away from the streets. Since Prince knew many important figures via his car job, he was able to successfully finesse his way into the music industry.

The Label’s Breakthrough Act, Geto Boys, Put the South on the Map

The Geto Boys, who were assembled by Prince in Houston’s Fifth Ward, consisted of his brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, Raheem and Sire Jukebox. Sir Rap-A-Lot and Raheem later left and were replaced with DJ Ready Red, Prince Johnny C and Bushwick Billy (Little Billy at the time). Originally called “the Ghetto Boys,” their first release, Making Trouble, flopped commerically and did not get much attention, so Prince created a revamped lineup: DJ Ready Red, Bushwick Bill, Scarface (then called Akshen) and Willie D. The new crew’s 1989 album Grip It! On That Other Level became a smash hit. The album sold millions of copies and got Def Jam co-founder and successful producer Rick Rubin to notice. They dropped their eponymous album in 1990 with Rubin and We Can’t Be Stopped in 1991; both were also nationwide successes.

Rap-A-Lot Launched the Careers of Houston’s Biggest Artists

At one point, Rap-A-Lot was not only the biggest label in Houston, but the entirety of the South. According to Prince in a 2012 NPR interview, “it was like flies to honey” the way rappers came to Rap-A-Lot in the mid-’90s. Outside of Geto Boys and its member, the label kickstarted or helped with the careers of Devin the Dude, Slim Thug, Lil Keke, Z-Ro, Trae, Pimp C, Bun B, Lil Flip and others. It was also a go-to label for acts outside of Houston, including Do or Die, Yukmouth, Luniz, Outlawz and more. Rap-A-Lot’s most notable albums include Geto Boys’ self-titled album, Scarface’s The Diary, Bun B’s Trill, Pimp C’s Pimpalation, Devin the Dude’s Waiting to Inhale and Big Mike’s Somethin’ Serious.

It Has a West Coast Sub-Label Called Smoke-A-Lot Records

Smoke-A-Lot Records is a label founded by East Oakland, California rapper Yukmouth and his manager Kat Gaynor. The name derives from Yukmouth’s Luniz nickname, "Smoke-A-Lot." It is distributed by Rap-A-Lot and Asylum, and houses artists including The Luniz, Dru Down, Thug Lordz, The Regime and Yuckmouth. From its conception in 1994 to now, Smoke-A-Lot has spawned 16 studio albums and eight mixtapes. It’s latest release is Yukmouth’s 2014 album GAS (Grow And Sale).

Devin the Dude Is the Label’s Longest-Running Artist

Devin Copeland, a humorously introspective, weed-loving Houston rapper better known by his moniker Devin the Dude, started his musical career out as a member of the Odd Squad (later known as the Coughee Brothaz) alongside Jugg Mugg and Rob Quest. Later, he joined Scarface’s Facemob and ultimately went solo in 1998. Since then, Devin dropped four solo albums with Rap-A-Lot, including his highest charting album Waitin’ to Inhale in 2007. His best known records, "Lacville ’79" and "Doobie Ashtray," were also release via the label. He ended his 15-year relationship with Rap-A-Lot in 2008, signing with indie label Razor & Tie. He is now being distributed by E1 Entertainment (formerly known as Koch).

Rap-A-Lot Had Distribution With Many Different Record Labels

Rap-A-Lot was first distributed by A&M Records for a short amount of time in order to release Raheem’s 1988 debut The Vigilante. Later, the label was distributed by EMI label’s Priority Records from 1991 to 1994, Noo Trybe Records from 1994 to 1998 and Noo Trybe’s parent company Virgin Records from 1998 to 2002. From 2002 to 2013, it was distributed by WEA’s Asylum Records then Fontana Distribution. From 2013 onwards, Rap-A-Lot is distributed by RED Distribution. Prince reveals that major labels had made it difficult for people to be aware of Rap-A-Lot. "Basically everything we released was slept on to a certain extent because we didn’t have the muscle that a lot of the majors had to get the maximum amount of sales," he told NPR.

James Prince Made Sure Things Went His Way

If you got on Prince’s bad side, he would definitely make it known to you. According to Green Label, Prince stood up for rappers many times who were on the losing end of a contractual war. He allegedly stopped a Young Money tour bus because he believed that his son, Jas, wasn’t fairly compensated for a Drake album. One time, Floyd Mayweather’s camp wanted to make a deal with Prince that he didn’t agree to and sent goons over to their gym to make it known. Another time, Master P became so offended that Pimp C said that P owed him money, but Prince stood up for C and told off Master P. Even some of his clients felt Prince’s wrath: Bushwick Bill was once allegedly beat up outside of a club after he had complained about pay.

There Are Only Three Artists on the Label’s Current Roster

Rap-A-Lot has seen better days. Although they were essentially running the South in the mid-to-late ’90s, the label has been rendered nearly defunct today. There are only three artists with some sort of contractual agreement with Rap-A-Lot today: Bun B, Z-Ro and Turk. In a 2012 interview with NPR, James Prince reveals that he’s not a fan of today’s music marketplace. "This whole game right now is a game that I’m not that excited about anymore because of the new structure and all these different ways of being able to get music without paying," he shared. "It kind of kills my spirit from an entrepreneurial perspective." He continued: "It’s not like it used to be. Trust me when I tell you that it’s nowhere even close to where it used to be. The majors are more in control now than they have been in a long time."

Jas Prince Discovered Drake & Connected Him with Lil Wayne

In 2015, James Prince got at Cash Money for the alleged mismanagement of Drake’s royalties. Prince’s son, Jas Prince, is credited with discovering Drake and bringing him to Lil Wayne’s attention at his Young Money Entertainment imprint. Jas eventually settled his $11 million lawsuit with Cash Money and its Young Money imprint over the case. Lil Wayne has even expressed his eagerness in 2016 to make Rap-A-Lot his home once his legal battle with Cash Money and Birdman is over. “Houston, Texas, before I leave y’all, I want to say I know I’ll always have a home at Rap-A-Lot Records," Wayne shared at an H-Town show. "And y’all know they’re f*cking me over right now. So, before I go, I leave you with these kinds words: f*ck Cash Money.”

The Last Album it Put Out is Juvenile’s The Fundamentals in 2014

The Fundamentals is Juvenile’s eleventh studio album and was released on February 18, 2014 by Rap-A-Lot Records. Juvy started his career out signed to Warlock Records, who released music by The Jungle Brothers and early Trick Daddy material. He then inked a deal with Cash Money Records and even became one of the faces of the label in the late ’90s. After leaving Cash Money, the New Orleans rapper singed with Atlantic Records and E1 for various projects. He released three albums with his U.T.P. crew (with Wacko and Skip) throughout the 2000s via Rap-A-Lot and dropped two solo LPs through the label, 2012’s Rejuvination and 2014’s The Fundamentals. On October 28, 2014, Juvenile announced and confirmed that he had left Rap-A-Lot and re-signed to Cash Money Records.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com



via Hypebeast

Supreme x Rap-A-Lot Records 2017 Spring/Summer Collection

After dropping a highly-anticipated North Face collaboration last week, New York-based label Supreme has just announced its latest project in the form of this Rap-A-Lot Records lineup. Created in 1987 by J. Prince in Houston, Texas, Rap-A-Lot Records put the spotlight on Houston with its ability to present unorthodox genres such as Gangster Rap and Horrorcore. It gave birth to numerous music acts such as Geto Boys, which originally included Sir Rap-A-Lot, Scarface, Bushwick Bill, Willie D and DJ Ready Red. Supreme drew inspiration for the graphics from the iconic image at the hospital where Bushwick Bill was shot in the eye due to an altercation. The offerings consist of a satin club jacket, hooded sweater, 5-panels, beanies, tees and a pillow. Moreover, four new graphic tees will also be releasing alongside this.

The collection will be available at Supreme’s New York, Los Angeles, London and Paris locations, as well as its online store on April 16. Japan will see a release on April 8.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com



via Hypebeast

Supreme x Rap-A-Lot Records 2017 Spring/Summer Collection

After dropping a highly-anticipated North Face collaboration last week, New York-based label Supreme has just announced its latest project in the form of this Rap-A-Lot Records lineup. Created in 1987 by J. Prince in Houston, Texas, Rap-A-Lot Records put the spotlight on Houston with its ability to present unorthodox genres such as Gangster Rap and Horrorcore. It gave birth to numerous music acts such as Geto Boys, which originally included Sir Rap-A-Lot, Scarface, Bushwick Bill, Willie D and DJ Ready Red. Supreme drew inspiration for the graphics from the iconic image at the hospital where Bushwick Bill was shot in the eye due to an altercation. The offerings consist of a satin club jacket, hooded sweater, 5-panels, beanies, tees and a pillow. Moreover, four new graphic tees will also be releasing alongside this.

The collection will be available at Supreme’s New York, Los Angeles, London and Paris locations, as well as its online store on April 16. Japan will see a release on April 8.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com



via Hypebeast

What is Rap-A-Lot Records?

Earlier today, Supreme announced that it has linked up with iconic Houston rap label Rap-A-Lot for its latest release. Rumors of this collaboration dates back to the beginning of this year, and the New York skate brand has finally taken to Instagram to release the teaser and images for the line. Rap-A-Lot was conceived in 1987 out of founder James Prince’s used car lot, originally as a way to keep his little brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, off the streets. Prince played the music game the same way he would’ve played the turf game and in a few years grew the label into a pillar of Houston and Southern hip-hop. The label introduced rap from the South to the world and delivered some of hip-hop’s biggest and most classic records of the ’90s. We’ve gathered ten important facts you should know about Rap-A-Lot Records, preferably before you cop the Supreme release when it drops on Thursday.

Rap-A-Lot Records Is a Houston Hip-Hop Label

Before James Prince founded Rap-A-Lot Records in 1987, Houston radio stations at the time would play whatever industry executives in New York City had told them to. Because of that, Houston was simply but an extension of everything that was happening in NYC. Prince, a fearless street hustler who sold exotic cars to gangsters and drug lords, didn’t like the way things were and found ways to make local stations to play his artists. James founded Rap-A-Lot to keep his brother and one of the founding members of The Geto Boys, Sir Rap-A-Lot, away from the streets. Since Prince knew many important figures via his car job, he was able to successfully finesse his way into the music industry.

The Label’s Breakthrough Act, Geto Boys, Put the South on the Map

The Geto Boys, who were assembled by Prince in Houston’s Fifth Ward, consisted of his brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, Raheem and Sire Jukebox. Sir Rap-A-Lot and Raheem later left and were replaced with DJ Ready Red, Prince Johnny C and Bushwick Billy (Little Billy at the time). Originally called “the Ghetto Boys,” their first release, Making Trouble, flopped commerically and did not get much attention, so Prince created a revamped lineup: DJ Ready Red, Bushwick Bill, Scarface (then called Akshen) and Willie D. The new crew’s 1989 album Grip It! On That Other Level became a smash hit. The album sold millions of copies and got Def Jam co-founder and successful producer Rick Rubin to notice. They dropped their eponymous album in 1990 with Rubin and We Can’t Be Stopped in 1991; both were also nationwide successes.

Rap-A-Lot Launched the Careers of Houston’s Biggest Artists

At one point, Rap-A-Lot was not only the biggest label in Houston, but the entirety of the South. According to Prince in a 2012 NPR interview, “it was like flies to honey” the way rappers came to Rap-A-Lot in the mid-’90s. Outside of Geto Boys and its member, the label kickstarted or helped with the careers of Devin the Dude, Slim Thug, Lil Keke, Z-Ro, Trae, Pimp C, Bun B, Lil Flip and others. It was also a go-to label for acts outside of Houston, including Do or Die, Yukmouth, Luniz, Outlawz and more. Rap-A-Lot’s most notable albums include Geto Boys’ self-titled album, Scarface’s The Diary, Bun B’s Trill, Pimp C’s Pimpalation, Devin the Dude’s Waiting to Inhale and Big Mike’s Somethin’ Serious.

It Has a West Coast Sub-Label Called Smoke-A-Lot Records

Smoke-A-Lot Records is a label founded by East Oakland, California rapper Yukmouth and his manager Kat Gaynor. The name derives from Yukmouth’s Luniz nickname, "Smoke-A-Lot." It is distributed by Rap-A-Lot and Asylum, and houses artists including The Luniz, Dru Down, Thug Lordz, The Regime and Yuckmouth. From its conception in 1994 to now, Smoke-A-Lot has spawned 16 studio albums and eight mixtapes. It’s latest release is Yukmouth’s 2014 album GAS (Grow And Sale).

Devin the Dude Is the Label’s Longest-Running Artist

Devin Copeland, a humorously introspective, weed-loving Houston rapper better known by his moniker Devin the Dude, started his musical career out as a member of the Odd Squad (later known as the Coughee Brothaz) alongside Jugg Mugg and Rob Quest. Later, he joined Scarface’s Facemob and ultimately went solo in 1998. Since then, Devin dropped four solo albums with Rap-A-Lot, including his highest charting album Waitin’ to Inhale in 2007. His best known records, "Lacville ’79" and "Doobie Ashtray," were also release via the label. He ended his 15-year relationship with Rap-A-Lot in 2008, signing with indie label Razor & Tie. He is now being distributed by E1 Entertainment (formerly known as Koch).

Rap-A-Lot Had Distribution With Many Different Record Labels

Rap-A-Lot was first distributed by A&M Records for a short amount of time in order to release Raheem’s 1988 debut The Vigilante. Later, the label was distributed by EMI label’s Priority Records from 1991 to 1994, Noo Trybe Records from 1994 to 1998 and Noo Trybe’s parent company Virgin Records from 1998 to 2002. From 2002 to 2013, it was distributed by WEA’s Asylum Records then Fontana Distribution. From 2013 onwards, Rap-A-Lot is distributed by RED Distribution. Prince reveals that major labels had made it difficult for people to be aware of Rap-A-Lot. "Basically everything we released was slept on to a certain extent because we didn’t have the muscle that a lot of the majors had to get the maximum amount of sales," he told NPR.

James Prince Made Sure Things Went His Way

If you got on Prince’s bad side, he would definitely make it known to you. According to Green Label, Prince stood up for rappers many times who were on the losing end of a contractual war. He allegedly stopped a Young Money tour bus because he believed that his son, Jas, wasn’t fairly compensated for a Drake album. One time, Floyd Mayweather’s camp wanted to make a deal with Prince that he didn’t agree to and sent goons over to their gym to make it known. Another time, Master P became so offended that Pimp C said that P owed him money, but Prince stood up for C and told off Master P. Even some of his clients felt Prince’s wrath: Bushwick Bill was once allegedly beat up outside of a club after he had complained about pay.

There Are Only Three Artists on the Label’s Current Roster

Rap-A-Lot has seen better days. Although they were essentially running the South in the mid-to-late ’90s, the label has been rendered nearly defunct today. There are only three artists with some sort of contractual agreement with Rap-A-Lot today: Bun B, Z-Ro and Turk. In a 2012 interview with NPR, James Prince reveals that he’s not a fan of today’s music marketplace. "This whole game right now is a game that I’m not that excited about anymore because of the new structure and all these different ways of being able to get music without paying," he shared. "It kind of kills my spirit from an entrepreneurial perspective." He continued: "It’s not like it used to be. Trust me when I tell you that it’s nowhere even close to where it used to be. The majors are more in control now than they have been in a long time."

Jas Prince Discovered Drake & Connected Him with Lil Wayne

In 2015, James Prince got at Cash Money for the alleged mismanagement of Drake’s royalties. Prince’s son, Jas Prince, is credited with discovering Drake and bringing him to Lil Wayne’s attention at his Young Money Entertainment imprint. Jas eventually settled his $11 million lawsuit with Cash Money and its Young Money imprint over the case. Lil Wayne has even expressed his eagerness in 2016 to make Rap-A-Lot his home once his legal battle with Cash Money and Birdman is over. “Houston, Texas, before I leave y’all, I want to say I know I’ll always have a home at Rap-A-Lot Records," Wayne shared at an H-Town show. "And y’all know they’re f*cking me over right now. So, before I go, I leave you with these kinds words: f*ck Cash Money.”

The Last Album it Put Out is Juvenile’s The Fundamentals in 2014

The Fundamentals is Juvenile’s eleventh studio album and was released on February 18, 2014 by Rap-A-Lot Records. Juvy started his career out signed to Warlock Records, who released music by The Jungle Brothers and early Trick Daddy material. He then inked a deal with Cash Money Records and even became one of the faces of the label in the late ’90s. After leaving Cash Money, the New Orleans rapper singed with Atlantic Records and E1 for various projects. He released three albums with his U.T.P. crew (with Wacko and Skip) throughout the 2000s via Rap-A-Lot and dropped two solo LPs through the label, 2012’s Rejuvination and 2014’s The Fundamentals. On October 28, 2014, Juvenile announced and confirmed that he had left Rap-A-Lot and re-signed to Cash Money Records.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com



via Hypebeast

What is Rap-A-Lot Records?

Earlier today, Supreme announced that it has linked up with iconic Houston rap label Rap-A-Lot for its latest release. Rumors of this collaboration dates back to the beginning of this year, and the New York skate brand has finally taken to Instagram to release the teaser and images for the line. Rap-A-Lot was conceived in 1987 out of founder James Prince’s used car lot, originally as a way to keep his little brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, off the streets. Prince played the music game the same way he would’ve played the turf game and in a few years grew the label into a pillar of Houston and Southern hip-hop. The label introduced rap from the South to the world and delivered some of hip-hop’s biggest and most classic records of the ’90s. We’ve gathered ten important facts you should know about Rap-A-Lot Records, preferably before you cop the Supreme release when it drops on Thursday.

Rap-A-Lot Records Is a Houston Hip-Hop Label

Before James Prince founded Rap-A-Lot Records in 1987, Houston radio stations at the time would play whatever industry executives in New York City had told them to. Because of that, Houston was simply but an extension of everything that was happening in NYC. Prince, a fearless street hustler who sold exotic cars to gangsters and drug lords, didn’t like the way things were and found ways to make local stations to play his artists. James founded Rap-A-Lot to keep his brother and one of the founding members of The Geto Boys, Sir Rap-A-Lot, away from the streets. Since Prince knew many important figures via his car job, he was able to successfully finesse his way into the music industry.

The Label’s Breakthrough Act, Geto Boys, Put the South on the Map

The Geto Boys, who were assembled by Prince in Houston’s Fifth Ward, consisted of his brother Sir Rap-A-Lot, Raheem and Sire Jukebox. Sir Rap-A-Lot and Raheem later left and were replaced with DJ Ready Red, Prince Johnny C and Bushwick Billy (Little Billy at the time). Originally called “the Ghetto Boys,” their first release, Making Trouble, flopped commerically and did not get much attention, so Prince created a revamped lineup: DJ Ready Red, Bushwick Bill, Scarface (then called Akshen) and Willie D. The new crew’s 1989 album Grip It! On That Other Level became a smash hit. The album sold millions of copies and got Def Jam co-founder and successful producer Rick Rubin to notice. They dropped their eponymous album in 1990 with Rubin and We Can’t Be Stopped in 1991; both were also nationwide successes.

Rap-A-Lot Launched the Careers of Houston’s Biggest Artists

At one point, Rap-A-Lot was not only the biggest label in Houston, but the entirety of the South. According to Prince in a 2012 NPR interview, “it was like flies to honey” the way rappers came to Rap-A-Lot in the mid-’90s. Outside of Geto Boys and its member, the label kickstarted or helped with the careers of Devin the Dude, Slim Thug, Lil Keke, Z-Ro, Trae, Pimp C, Bun B, Lil Flip and others. It was also a go-to label for acts outside of Houston, including Do or Die, Yukmouth, Luniz, Outlawz and more. Rap-A-Lot’s most notable albums include Geto Boys’ self-titled album, Scarface’s The Diary, Bun B’s Trill, Pimp C’s Pimpalation, Devin the Dude’s Waiting to Inhale and Big Mike’s Somethin’ Serious.

It Has a West Coast Sub-Label Called Smoke-A-Lot Records

Smoke-A-Lot Records is a label founded by East Oakland, California rapper Yukmouth and his manager Kat Gaynor. The name derives from Yukmouth’s Luniz nickname, "Smoke-A-Lot." It is distributed by Rap-A-Lot and Asylum, and houses artists including The Luniz, Dru Down, Thug Lordz, The Regime and Yuckmouth. From its conception in 1994 to now, Smoke-A-Lot has spawned 16 studio albums and eight mixtapes. It’s latest release is Yukmouth’s 2014 album GAS (Grow And Sale).

Devin the Dude Is the Label’s Longest-Running Artist

Devin Copeland, a humorously introspective, weed-loving Houston rapper better known by his moniker Devin the Dude, started his musical career out as a member of the Odd Squad (later known as the Coughee Brothaz) alongside Jugg Mugg and Rob Quest. Later, he joined Scarface’s Facemob and ultimately went solo in 1998. Since then, Devin dropped four solo albums with Rap-A-Lot, including his highest charting album Waitin’ to Inhale in 2007. His best known records, "Lacville ’79" and "Doobie Ashtray," were also release via the label. He ended his 15-year relationship with Rap-A-Lot in 2008, signing with indie label Razor & Tie. He is now being distributed by E1 Entertainment (formerly known as Koch).

Rap-A-Lot Had Distribution With Many Different Record Labels

Rap-A-Lot was first distributed by A&M Records for a short amount of time in order to release Raheem’s 1988 debut The Vigilante. Later, the label was distributed by EMI label’s Priority Records from 1991 to 1994, Noo Trybe Records from 1994 to 1998 and Noo Trybe’s parent company Virgin Records from 1998 to 2002. From 2002 to 2013, it was distributed by WEA’s Asylum Records then Fontana Distribution. From 2013 onwards, Rap-A-Lot is distributed by RED Distribution. Prince reveals that major labels had made it difficult for people to be aware of Rap-A-Lot. "Basically everything we released was slept on to a certain extent because we didn’t have the muscle that a lot of the majors had to get the maximum amount of sales," he told NPR.

James Prince Made Sure Things Went His Way

If you got on Prince’s bad side, he would definitely make it known to you. According to Green Label, Prince stood up for rappers many times who were on the losing end of a contractual war. He allegedly stopped a Young Money tour bus because he believed that his son, Jas, wasn’t fairly compensated for a Drake album. One time, Floyd Mayweather’s camp wanted to make a deal with Prince that he didn’t agree to and sent goons over to their gym to make it known. Another time, Master P became so offended that Pimp C said that P owed him money, but Prince stood up for C and told off Master P. Even some of his clients felt Prince’s wrath: Bushwick Bill was once allegedly beat up outside of a club after he had complained about pay.

There Are Only Three Artists on the Label’s Current Roster

Rap-A-Lot has seen better days. Although they were essentially running the South in the mid-to-late ’90s, the label has been rendered nearly defunct today. There are only three artists with some sort of contractual agreement with Rap-A-Lot today: Bun B, Z-Ro and Turk. In a 2012 interview with NPR, James Prince reveals that he’s not a fan of today’s music marketplace. "This whole game right now is a game that I’m not that excited about anymore because of the new structure and all these different ways of being able to get music without paying," he shared. "It kind of kills my spirit from an entrepreneurial perspective." He continued: "It’s not like it used to be. Trust me when I tell you that it’s nowhere even close to where it used to be. The majors are more in control now than they have been in a long time."

Jas Prince Discovered Drake & Connected Him with Lil Wayne

In 2015, James Prince got at Cash Money for the alleged mismanagement of Drake’s royalties. Prince’s son, Jas Prince, is credited with discovering Drake and bringing him to Lil Wayne’s attention at his Young Money Entertainment imprint. Jas eventually settled his $11 million lawsuit with Cash Money and its Young Money imprint over the case. Lil Wayne has even expressed his eagerness in 2016 to make Rap-A-Lot his home once his legal battle with Cash Money and Birdman is over. “Houston, Texas, before I leave y’all, I want to say I know I’ll always have a home at Rap-A-Lot Records," Wayne shared at an H-Town show. "And y’all know they’re f*cking me over right now. So, before I go, I leave you with these kinds words: f*ck Cash Money.”

The Last Album it Put Out is Juvenile’s The Fundamentals in 2014

The Fundamentals is Juvenile’s eleventh studio album and was released on February 18, 2014 by Rap-A-Lot Records. Juvy started his career out signed to Warlock Records, who released music by The Jungle Brothers and early Trick Daddy material. He then inked a deal with Cash Money Records and even became one of the faces of the label in the late ’90s. After leaving Cash Money, the New Orleans rapper singed with Atlantic Records and E1 for various projects. He released three albums with his U.T.P. crew (with Wacko and Skip) throughout the 2000s via Rap-A-Lot and dropped two solo LPs through the label, 2012’s Rejuvination and 2014’s The Fundamentals. On October 28, 2014, Juvenile announced and confirmed that he had left Rap-A-Lot and re-signed to Cash Money Records.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com



via Hypebeast

The Most Popular Nike Flyknit Racer Of All Time Returns This Week


Visit the original post to see all 7 images from this gallery.

Nike’s Flyknit Racer is the shoe that brought knitted uppers to the world of sneakers and therefore it is without surprise that it remains to be one of the lightest, most comfortable and most hyped sneakers in the brand’s line-up. The most popular version of the shoe, the multi-color version, will see an official global re-release this week. The multicolor version really demonstrates what one can do with a knitted upper versus other materials. The multicolor Nike Flyknit Racer will release for $150 at select retailers and on Nike.com, on April 7 at 10 am.

via Highsnobiety

The Most Popular Nike Flyknit Racer Of All Time Returns This Week


Visit the original post to see all 7 images from this gallery.

Nike’s Flyknit Racer is the shoe that brought knitted uppers to the world of sneakers and therefore it is without surprise that it remains to be one of the lightest, most comfortable and most hyped sneakers in the brand’s line-up. The most popular version of the shoe, the multi-color version, will see an official global re-release this week. The multicolor version really demonstrates what one can do with a knitted upper versus other materials. The multicolor Nike Flyknit Racer will release for $150 at select retailers and on Nike.com, on April 7 at 10 am.

via Highsnobiety

The Nike Air More Uptempo Gets a “Knicks” Colorway

Nike continues to roll out additional iterations of its Air More Uptempo sneaker, following its anticipated Supreme collaboration and recent return of the “Bulls” colorway. It appears that the latest rendition pays homage to the New York Knicks, comprised of blue “AIR” lettering contrasted against a white upper, along with orange accents. The silhouette includes the number “33″ embroidered on the heel, referencing Patrick Ewing’s during his time on the team, but also coincides with Scottie Pippen, who played for the Knicks’ biggest rival in the ’90s. While an official release date has yet to be announced, be sure to check back for more updates.

via Hypebeast

The Nike Air More Uptempo Gets a “Knicks” Colorway

Nike continues to roll out additional iterations of its Air More Uptempo sneaker, following its anticipated Supreme collaboration and recent return of the “Bulls” colorway. It appears that the latest rendition pays homage to the New York Knicks, comprised of blue “AIR” lettering contrasted against a white upper, along with orange accents. The silhouette includes the number “33″ embroidered on the heel, referencing Patrick Ewing’s during his time on the team, but also coincides with Scottie Pippen, who played for the Knicks’ biggest rival in the ’90s. While an official release date has yet to be announced, be sure to check back for more updates.

via Hypebeast

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” Launches in April

Will the Tar Heels cut down the nets in the days to come? Fans in argyle sure hope so, but regardless we all win with the Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” re-release. Originally launched back in 2001 in a move that brought patent leather low tops to the retail world, this colorway made the most of Mike’s alma mater as well as the hottest team tone of that era.

Back once again, look for these to launch at select Jordan Brand accounts such as CNCPTS on April 15th.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

Colorway: White/University Blue
Style Code: 528895-106
Release Date: April 15, 2017
Price: $175

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

via Nice Kicks – Air Force Ones, Air Jordans, Release Dates and sneaker news.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” Launches in April

Will the Tar Heels cut down the nets in the days to come? Fans in argyle sure hope so, but regardless we all win with the Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” re-release. Originally launched back in 2001 in a move that brought patent leather low tops to the retail world, this colorway made the most of Mike’s alma mater as well as the hottest team tone of that era.

Back once again, look for these to launch at select Jordan Brand accounts such as CNCPTS on April 15th.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

Colorway: White/University Blue
Style Code: 528895-106
Release Date: April 15, 2017
Price: $175

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

via Nice Kicks – Air Force Ones, Air Jordans, Release Dates and sneaker news.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” Launches in April

Will the Tar Heels cut down the nets in the days to come? Fans in argyle sure hope so, but regardless we all win with the Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” re-release. Originally launched back in 2001 in a move that brought patent leather low tops to the retail world, this colorway made the most of Mike’s alma mater as well as the hottest team tone of that era.

Back once again, look for these to launch at select Jordan Brand accounts such as CNCPTS on April 15th.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

Colorway: White/University Blue
Style Code: 528895-106
Release Date: April 15, 2017
Price: $175

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

via Nice Kicks – Air Force Ones, Air Jordans, Release Dates and sneaker news.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” Launches in April

Will the Tar Heels cut down the nets in the days to come? Fans in argyle sure hope so, but regardless we all win with the Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” re-release. Originally launched back in 2001 in a move that brought patent leather low tops to the retail world, this colorway made the most of Mike’s alma mater as well as the hottest team tone of that era.

Back once again, look for these to launch at select Jordan Brand accounts such as CNCPTS on April 15th.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

Colorway: White/University Blue
Style Code: 528895-106
Release Date: April 15, 2017
Price: $175

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

via Nice Kicks – Air Force Ones, Air Jordans, Release Dates and sneaker news.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” Launches in April

Will the Tar Heels cut down the nets in the days to come? Fans in argyle sure hope so, but regardless we all win with the Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue” re-release. Originally launched back in 2001 in a move that brought patent leather low tops to the retail world, this colorway made the most of Mike’s alma mater as well as the hottest team tone of that era.

Back once again, look for these to launch at select Jordan Brand accounts such as CNCPTS on April 15th.

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

Colorway: White/University Blue
Style Code: 528895-106
Release Date: April 15, 2017
Price: $175

Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”
Air Jordan 11 Low “University Blue”

via Nice Kicks – Air Force Ones, Air Jordans, Release Dates and sneaker news.

Nike Air Max 97 “Silver Bullet” // Coming Soon

Air Max Day has came and went, but if things go as the Swoosh hopes then the Vis Air wave is only rising. Case in point is the Nike Air Max 97 “Silver Bullet” that’s set to re-launch next month. Dropping ten years after the OG AM1, this model shows the progression of Air and design in full-length fashion with reflective design and overseas appeal making for a real icon.

Hitting Nike Sportswear accounts such as CNCPTS on April 15th, preview this pair in the photos below.

Nike Air Max 97 OG QS “Silver Bullet”

Colorway: Metallic Silver/Varsity Red-White-Black
Style #: 884421-001
Release Date: April 15, 2017
Price: $175

Nike Air Max 97 "Silver Bullet"
Nike Air Max 97 “Silver Bullet”
Nike Air Max 97 "Silver Bullet"
Nike Air Max 97 “Silver Bullet”
Nike Air Max 97 "Silver Bullet"
Nike Air Max 97 “Silver Bullet”
Nike Air Max 97 "Silver Bullet"
Nike Air Max 97 “Silver Bullet”

via Nice Kicks – Air Force Ones, Air Jordans, Release Dates and sneaker news.